The National Folk Festival Is Back In North Carolina For One Last Year

The National Folk Festival Is Back In North Carolina For One Last Year

31st Aug 2017 Community

Mark your calendar for the biggest party in town – the 77th National Folk Festival, running September 8-10, 2017 in downtown Greensboro!

Festival attendees enjoying the music!

Don’t miss the opportunity to join us for the final year of the National Folk Festival—one of America’s largest and longest-running celebrations of music, art, culture, and heritage. The best part? This three-day celebration is FREE to attend!

More than 300 performers and artists from all across the nation—musicians, dancers, storytellers, and craftspeople—will take part in the large-scale, three-day outdoor festival, with more than 50 different acts performing across seven outdoor stages throughout downtown Greensboro.

The celebration will kick off at 6:00 p.m. on Friday evening with a performance by New Orleans’ legendary Tremé Brass Band.  The band will start on the Wrangler stage and join the crowd for the festival’s traditional opening parade through downtown. Bring your Mardi Gras beads and your colorful

Woman dressed in traditional Bahamas Junkanoo

umbrella and join in on the fun!

To accompany the above artists, the National Folk Festival will feature a variety of savory, southern dishes and ethnic foods as well as classic festival fare that will take diners on a culinary journey around North Carolina, America, and the world. On tap at the festival will be beer by Foothills and Natty Greene’s, cider by Bull City Ciderworks, and wine by Noble Vines and Bota Box.

Based on the success of the National Folk Festival, organizers are planning a legacy North Carolina Folk Festival which will take place September 7-9, 2018 in downtown Greensboro. Check NCFolkFestival.com over the coming months for updates.

To view the full 2017 festival performance schedule, learn more about the artists, explore the food and

Tap Dancer at LeBauer Park

marketplace vendors, and other event information please visit nationalfolkfestival.com.

You can stay connected to the event on Facebook (facebook.com/NationalFolkFestivalNC), Twitter (twitter.com/NtlFolkFestNC), Instagram (instagram.com/nationalfolkfestnc), and on the National Folk Festival/17DAYS app (https://admin.myeventapps.com/artsgreensboro/downloads).

 

Downtown Greensboro’s New Addition

Downtown Greensboro’s New Addition

26th Aug 2016 (Y)our Greensboro, Community

By: Cedric Blue II

August 8, 2016 marked the beginning of a new era in downtown Greensboro. The first to be completed in a series of major construction projects changing the face of downtown Greensboro, LeBauer Park opened to the public with one of the largest group ribbon cuttings that I have ever witnessed. That diverse crowd of excited locals simultaneously cutting the ribbon would foreshadow one of the most dynamic and important features of the park; its ability to bring people together.

Where We Met- from belwo

      Where We Met- the view from below

Art lovers will tell you how gorgeous the Janet Echelman sculpture “Where We Met” is when it is lit at night above the Price/Bryan Performance Place. Kids are prone to gush over the Children’s Garden and its innovative features that make it one of the most unique play spaces in the county. And dog lovers will tell you what a welcome addition the Downtown Greensboro Animal Hospital Dog Park is to the area. However, the most impressive aspect of LeBauer to me is its patronage.

As a born and raised Greensboro local I can say with a fair amount of certainty that the crowds flocking to the park daily are some of the most diverse that I have ever seen at a public meeting space in Greensboro. People of all ages, races, and walks of life not only share the space but interact with one another on many different levels.

All of this has given me so much more context for the park’s artistic centerpiece, “Where We Met.” Echelman’s interpretation of the converging NC rail lines that gave us the nickname “The Gate City” is a macro concept happening on a micro level right now in Greensboro at LeBauer Park. Not even two weeks old, the park is one of the strongest points of convergence in Greensboro. It is my sincere hope that this sense of unity and camaraderie continues to flourish in the park and carries on to the different other projects being completed downtown in the coming years.

And by the way, if for some unthinkable reason you’re not impressed thus far, keep your eyes on the park this winter. Chatter on the line has it that there’s a strong chance of snow…..

 

 

 

Collaborative Space, a new frontier.

Collaborative Space, a new frontier.

26th Jun 2016 Community

Written by Joe Rotondi

There has been a trend quickly moving across the globe. Collaborative spaces and makerspaces share resources in a way that makes them affordable to many who wouldn’t be able to access them otherwise. Sound like social capitalism…or capitalist socialism? Or could it be just a smart business model.

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A peek  inside Forge Greensboro; Photo by: Joe Rotondi

From  a macro perspective, these spaces are almost indiscernible from one another. They all promote open access, are made up of diverse and loyal communities which share the financial burden of resources that would be expensive for any one individual or business to bear alone.

Have a large conference space and and AV equipment, or a half ton Colchester machining lathe in the middle of a downtown, but only need to use them twice a week? Why not share that cost with a dozen or more others? Schedule to use it when you need to use it and only pay a fraction of the cost through a monthly subscription.That is just smart business.

More than just sharing the resources, these communities are about enabling each other. Exchanging ideas, networks, referring clients, bartering or sourcing skills or services are all added benefits of working in a diverse community that shares resources. “Water cooler” conversations happen throughout these, and go far beyond idle banter. These exchanges are leading to strong buzzwords: ideas, collaboration, and innovation.

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Collaboration in progress; Photo by: Joe Rotondi

Greensboro has examples of all of these spaces. On a micro perspective, they do differ, even within the same category. Our coworking spaces include Naussbaum Center, Co/Lab, HQ Greensboro. As for makerspaces we have Forge GSO, SELF Design Studio, A&T Makerspace, Public Library Makerspace, among other school makerspaces.

I have the privilege of working at Forge Greensboro. Though I give tours describing collaborative space daily, I am continually surprised by how others come to interact and utilyze them. In my next few posts, I will explore our local spaces to find out what they mean to those who use them most.

-joe

Greensboro Close Up: Hudson’s Hill

Greensboro Close Up: Hudson’s Hill

24th May 2016 (Y)our Greensboro, Community

Written by: Carlee Dempsey

photo courtesy of Our State Magazine

Photo By:  Our State Magazine

Name: William Clayton

Company: Hudson’s Hill, President

Location: 527 S Elm Street, Greensboro, NC

Opened in: 2011 (Originally under the name Civic Threads. Transformed into Hudson’s Hill after merging with Gate City Dry Goods in 2014).

How did you get into the world of clothing / retail?
My family owns StitchFX, also located in Downtown Greensboro, which specializes in embroidery, screenprinting, and embellishments. So I got a taste of the industry, both on the buying and wholesale sides, through them. Throughout high school and college, I have always been enamored with the way people express themselves. After receiving my degree in Communication Studies from UNCG, I decided to open my own company with my dad and sister, Civic Threads. From there, it steadily transformed into Hudson’s Hill.

Why did you decide to open your business in Greensboro?
After living on the West Coast for 6 months after college, I learned how much the people and the unique shops affected the atmosphere and cities of the areas I visited. When I returned to Greensboro, I noticed a large lack of these niche markets and stores. I couldn’t help but feel Greensboro was missing out on great opportunities. The history of Greensboro and its impact on the world during the days of Cone Mills lent even further to the city’s overall potential. So I saw an opportunity to create something not only new and unique but also something that would be an ode of sorts to Greensboro’s rich history.

Why did you decide to open your business in downtown Greensboro?
Much like the city as a whole, downtown was brimming with potential. That, along with finding the perfect location in the Coe Grocery and Seed Company, made the decision to open in downtown an easy fit.

How long have you lived in GSO?
My entire life, except for the 6-month stint on the West Coast.

Why did you choose to stay in GSO?
Honestly, I had every intention of moving back to the West Coast but on whim, we opened Civic Threads and before I knew it we were merging with Evan Morrison of Gate City Dry Goods Co. and now, 2 years later here we are. Hudson’s Hill has transformed from a t-shirt company into clothing and goods market, where everything is sourced as local as possible. Along, with making jeans to order, we have also started lifetime warranty denim repairs.

What is your favorite part of living in GSO?
My favorite thing about GSO is that it’s a big city with a small town feel. I feel like I have only explored a fraction of what Greensboro has to offer but I run into people I know everywhere I go. Greensboro also has a ton of potential. We are the home to numerous businesses, colleges, and events. It’s the perfect city for young professionals and entrepreneurs and I’ve loved being a part of the process of building up GSO.

What’s your favorite local spot?
I have a few spots I frequent a lot! They’re mostly unique, hole in the wall spots (like my own shop). Sticks and Stones, The Table on Elm, Gibbs & Preyer, Yum Yums, Beef Burger (one of the original Burger Kings!), and College Hill are my go to’s.

Greensboro’s Unlikely Oasis

Greensboro’s Unlikely Oasis

Written by Jeff Lail

Greensboro has some great parks, including the enormous Guilford Courthouse National Military Park and the series of connected Greenways, but my favorite is a tiny gem nestled close to the Friendly Center Shopping Center, the Greensboro Bog Garden.  Amid the hustle and bustle of one of the busier areas, the Bog Garden is filled with interesting wildlife and plants as well as the bog itself.

A walking trail runs from Northline Avenue (behind the Harris Teeter in Friendly Center) into the Bog Garden, but most folks access the park from Starmount Farms Drive by parking on the street in this residential area and finding the entrance by the statue.  A boardwalk runs around the marshier parts of the park, but there are also many walking trails to explore the ends of the park.
Barred Owl

Barred Owl

 

The wildlife is one of the best things about this park.  A large group of residential ducks live here year round, as do many other species, but this is also a seasonal stop for a variety of other species like gulls and other types of ducks.  Bring your binoculars and look out across the pond or hike down through the woods on the side of the pond and you might be surprised what you see.  I’ve personally seen several types of gulls, herons, woodpeckers, and ducks as well as a kingfisher.

One of the year round residents is a barred owl that resides in the area around the bamboo on the boardwalk.  If you’re having a hard time locating the owl, there are often some helpful neighborhood folks around who can spot him.  If you’re there around dusk, you can occasionally hear the owl hooting.
The main thing that I love about the Bog Garden is that it’s convenient to the places I live and work but still so peaceful.  You can certainly hear cars going to and from Friendly Center, but it’s an oasis in a noisy city that’s easy to get to and enjoy.