Greensboro Close Up: Hudson’s Hill

Greensboro Close Up: Hudson’s Hill

24th May 2016 (Y)our Greensboro, Community

Written by: Carlee Dempsey

photo courtesy of Our State Magazine

Photo By:  Our State Magazine

Name: William Clayton

Company: Hudson’s Hill, President

Location: 527 S Elm Street, Greensboro, NC

Opened in: 2011 (Originally under the name Civic Threads. Transformed into Hudson’s Hill after merging with Gate City Dry Goods in 2014).

How did you get into the world of clothing / retail?
My family owns StitchFX, also located in Downtown Greensboro, which specializes in embroidery, screenprinting, and embellishments. So I got a taste of the industry, both on the buying and wholesale sides, through them. Throughout high school and college, I have always been enamored with the way people express themselves. After receiving my degree in Communication Studies from UNCG, I decided to open my own company with my dad and sister, Civic Threads. From there, it steadily transformed into Hudson’s Hill.

Why did you decide to open your business in Greensboro?
After living on the West Coast for 6 months after college, I learned how much the people and the unique shops affected the atmosphere and cities of the areas I visited. When I returned to Greensboro, I noticed a large lack of these niche markets and stores. I couldn’t help but feel Greensboro was missing out on great opportunities. The history of Greensboro and its impact on the world during the days of Cone Mills lent even further to the city’s overall potential. So I saw an opportunity to create something not only new and unique but also something that would be an ode of sorts to Greensboro’s rich history.

Why did you decide to open your business in downtown Greensboro?
Much like the city as a whole, downtown was brimming with potential. That, along with finding the perfect location in the Coe Grocery and Seed Company, made the decision to open in downtown an easy fit.

How long have you lived in GSO?
My entire life, except for the 6-month stint on the West Coast.

Why did you choose to stay in GSO?
Honestly, I had every intention of moving back to the West Coast but on whim, we opened Civic Threads and before I knew it we were merging with Evan Morrison of Gate City Dry Goods Co. and now, 2 years later here we are. Hudson’s Hill has transformed from a t-shirt company into clothing and goods market, where everything is sourced as local as possible. Along, with making jeans to order, we have also started lifetime warranty denim repairs.

What is your favorite part of living in GSO?
My favorite thing about GSO is that it’s a big city with a small town feel. I feel like I have only explored a fraction of what Greensboro has to offer but I run into people I know everywhere I go. Greensboro also has a ton of potential. We are the home to numerous businesses, colleges, and events. It’s the perfect city for young professionals and entrepreneurs and I’ve loved being a part of the process of building up GSO.

What’s your favorite local spot?
I have a few spots I frequent a lot! They’re mostly unique, hole in the wall spots (like my own shop). Sticks and Stones, The Table on Elm, Gibbs & Preyer, Yum Yums, Beef Burger (one of the original Burger Kings!), and College Hill are my go to’s.

MADE IN GREENSBORO: IRVING ALLEN, 29, COMMUNITY ORGANIZER

MADE IN GREENSBORO: IRVING ALLEN, 29, COMMUNITY ORGANIZER

Irving Allen is the part of a legacy.

Irving’s uncle, David Richmond, was one of “the A&T Four,” a group of students who launched the lunch counter sit-in protests in Greensboro in the 1960s. Irving’s father, Steve Allen, was a civil rights attorney and the first black superior court judge in Guilford County. His parents and other black families banded together to grow a neighborhood in Pleasant Garden.

But the 29-year-old is blazing his own path, as a new generation leader working to improve his community.

Allen is the Triad regional coordinator of Ignite NC, an organization dedicated to building the leadership and power of young people to fight for social change.

“Young people are the only re007_pv_i_allen_BC8U5007bwason anything has changed in this country, ever,” Allen says.

He also leads the Gate City Black Lives Matter group, which he and others use to organize social movements in Greensboro. He organizes meetings, marches, concerts. He participates in conversations about race with police and advocates for a better public education system in Guilford County.

“My role is to use my relationships and the way people view me — whether it’s through my family or the history of the work I’ve done or the people I’ve worked with — to get resources to people who don’t have them.”

This notion of getting resources to people who don’t have them means that Irving is working to provide better access to money, and other tools like vans to organize and better their community by getting rid of the gatekeepers to those resources. If someone has an idea to better their community, they should be able to execute it, Irving says.

So he works to help break down the barriers. “I really don’t see myself representing folks, I see myself with the folks. We rarely do things alone.”

 

 

 

ABOUT MADE IN GREENSBORO

We are Greensboro, North Carolina. We are the city of makers.

We design, build, create. We roll up our sleeves. We get our hands dirty. We get it done. We make it happen.

Made in Greensboro celebrates those makers — the entrepreneurs, the artists, the community builders, the next generation of leaders.

Check out other Made In Greensboro profiles here.